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Current news:

Until November 30,
Lost in Infinity 3 on view in a group show “Better with Age”, presented by the office of Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. 1 Centre Street, 19th floor south.

Until January 3,
Journal Entry 14, on view in a group show Art as Sanctuary, New York Society of Women Artists, in the Livingroom Gallery of St. Peter’s Church, Lexington Avenue at 53rd Street.

November-December 2017, a residency at the Carter Burden Center, 312 E. 109th Street.


Please visit my website francineperlman.com

Recent news:


January, 2017, a room-size installation called Doors Open, Doors Close at Ceres Gallery, 547 W. 27th Street, 2nd floor. Tuesday-Saturday noon-6, Thursdays noon-8. Small works by women in domestic violence shelters are incorporated into my larger work.


I have 300 tiny works in Artists in the Archives: The Alternet, a collaborative project with over 75 artists, created by Carla Rae Johnson. still traveling since Jan 2013.

My third solo of drawings at the Morningside branch of the New York Public Library, February, 2017. Check back for details, or sign up at my blog for announcements.


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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Art in the Archives, traveling show, just left City College, NY, off to Teaneck, NJ


i've got a whole drawer, 300 tiny works, collages, paintings, journal entries, jokes.


My drawer                           photo Elizabeth Knott


The show is soon to be in Teaneck, NY.  Check back for details.

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

There Once Was a Gazebo






Conceived as “A Gazebo”, this work was hopeful about the possibility of peace in the West Bank.  But during its development, the entire Middle East met calamity after catastrophe, and the piece changed accordingly.  I could no longer festoon its surfaces with colorful Palestinian and Israeli cultural icons.   It's still a quiet piece, because I am still a minimalist, that is, making my point with the least amount of structural material, but I'm hoping it causes people to reflect, to be moved, and to ask - what does she mean by that?, as I have been moved to ask myself.

I hoped that by calling it "There Once Was a Gazebo",  people would know I meant there was a peaceful place and now there isn't, and I hoped that the two newspaper photos in the piece would convey that I am now talking about Gaza without telling people what to think.  But not everyone is as obsessed with that part of the world as I am, so if people don't get the narrative, I think the aesthetic solution stands on its own, a very important aspect of all my work – room-like, lines, shadows.